SLIP WAYS
A slipway, also known as boat ramp or launch, is a ramp on the shore by which ships or boats can be moved to and from the water. They are used for building and repairing ships and boats. They are also used for launching and retrieving small boats on trailers towed by automobiles and flying boats on their undercarriage.
The nautical term ‘ ways’ is an alternative name for slipway. A ship undergoing construction in a shipyard is said to be on the ways. If a ship is scrapped there, she is said to be broken up in the ways.
 
As the word “slip” implies, the ships or boats are moved over the ramp, by way of crane or fork lift, prior to the move the vessel’s hull is coated with grease, which then allows the ship or boat to “slip” off of the ramp and progress safely into the water. Slipways are used to launch (newly built) large ships, but can only dry-dock or repair smaller ships. Pulling large ships against the greased ramp would require too much force. For dry-docking large ships, one must use carriages supported by wheels or by roller-pallets. These types of dry-docking installations are called “marine railways”. Nevertheless the words “slip” and “slipway” are also used for all dry-docking installations that use a ramp.
 
A lovely summary from Wikipedia.

SLIP WAYS

A slipway, also known as boat ramp or launch, is a ramp on the shore by which ships or boats can be moved to and from the water. They are used for building and repairing ships and boats. They are also used for launching and retrieving small boats on trailers towed by automobiles and flying boats on their undercarriage.

The nautical term ‘ ways’ is an alternative name for slipway. A ship undergoing construction in a shipyard is said to be on the ways. If a ship is scrapped there, she is said to be broken up in the ways.
 
As the word “slip” implies, the ships or boats are moved over the ramp, by way of crane or fork lift, prior to the move the vessel’s hull is coated with grease, which then allows the ship or boat to “slip” off of the ramp and progress safely into the water. Slipways are used to launch (newly built) large ships, but can only dry-dock or repair smaller ships. Pulling large ships against the greased ramp would require too much force. For dry-docking large ships, one must use carriages supported by wheels or by roller-pallets. These types of dry-docking installations are called “marine railways”. Nevertheless the words “slip” and “slipway” are also used for all dry-docking installations that use a ramp.
 
A lovely summary from Wikipedia.
SHINGLE BEACHES
A shingle beach is armoured with pebbles or cobbles as opposed to sand. Typically they are steep, because waves flow easily through the porous surface decreasing the effect of backwash erosion. Such beaches are often criticised for being more uncomfortable for visitors than sand. Those who frequent these wonderful places can attest that there is no dignified way of walking about on pebbles in bare feet! Shingle beaches form very important and specific habitats for plants and wildlife. Many are designated SSSIs (Site of Special Scientific Interest) and SNCIs (Site of Nature Conservation Importance) like Shoreham Beach pictured above.

SHINGLE BEACHES

A shingle beach is armoured with pebbles or cobbles as opposed to sand. Typically they are steep, because waves flow easily through the porous surface decreasing the effect of backwash erosion. Such beaches are often criticised for being more uncomfortable for visitors than sand. Those who frequent these wonderful places can attest that there is no dignified way of walking about on pebbles in bare feet! Shingle beaches form very important and specific habitats for plants and wildlife. Many are designated SSSIs (Site of Special Scientific Interest) and SNCIs (Site of Nature Conservation Importance) like Shoreham Beach pictured above.
THE SCHOFIELD COMP SLIP EXPLAINED
The Schofield compliment slip uses artwork that was developed for SalonQP 2012 and the launch of our Travel Wallet. Inspired by the Automatic Tide Marker Station situated at Irvine Harbour on the Clyde coast in Scotland where the River Irvine meets the sea. The Automatic Tide Marker Station is now a Grade B Listed Building and is probably unique in maritime history. Invented and patented by Martin Boyd the Irvine Harbourmaster in 1905 and opened in 1906, the device was designed to automatically signal the depth of water within harbours, docks, piers, navigable channels or the like. 
 
Boyd’s system used a chamber which was open to the sea and contained a float which was free to rise and fall with the tide. A rope attached to the float ran over a pulley and through a duct into a tower, where a system of levers and pulleys was used to raise and lower a number of black balls suspended on a mast mounted on the roof, thereby providing a daytime signal to craft approaching the harbour. At night, four gas lights mounted in the seaward windows of the tower would provide the same signal, as the pulley system obscured or revealed the lights in response to rise and fall of the tide. The more balls or lights visible, the deeper the water over the harbour mouth bar. The image above represents the black indicator balls looking back out to sea.
 
“Fair winds and a Following Sea” is an old sailors wish or farewell, pertinent to the Travel Wallet and to any of our products leaving Schofield HQ. The lights are navigation lights signalling a vessel engaged in pilotage duty.
 
SCHOFIELD ACCESSORIES 

THE SCHOFIELD COMP SLIP EXPLAINED

The Schofield compliment slip uses artwork that was developed for SalonQP 2012 and the launch of our Travel Wallet. Inspired by the Automatic Tide Marker Station situated at Irvine Harbour on the Clyde coast in Scotland where the River Irvine meets the sea. The Automatic Tide Marker Station is now a Grade B Listed Building and is probably unique in maritime history. Invented and patented by Martin Boyd the Irvine Harbourmaster in 1905 and opened in 1906, the device was designed to automatically signal the depth of water within harbours, docks, piers, navigable channels or the like. 
 
Boyd’s system used a chamber which was open to the sea and contained a float which was free to rise and fall with the tide. A rope attached to the float ran over a pulley and through a duct into a tower, where a system of levers and pulleys was used to raise and lower a number of black balls suspended on a mast mounted on the roof, thereby providing a daytime signal to craft approaching the harbour. At night, four gas lights mounted in the seaward windows of the tower would provide the same signal, as the pulley system obscured or revealed the lights in response to rise and fall of the tide. The more balls or lights visible, the deeper the water over the harbour mouth bar. The image above represents the black indicator balls looking back out to sea.
 
“Fair winds and a Following Sea” is an old sailors wish or farewell, pertinent to the Travel Wallet and to any of our products leaving Schofield HQ. The lights are navigation lights signalling a vessel engaged in pilotage duty.
 
LEGO
A container filled with millions of Lego pieces fell into the sea off Cornwall in 1997. But instead of remaining at the bottom of the ocean, they are still washing up on Cornish beaches today - offering an insight into the mysterious world of oceans and tides. Read more here…
BBC NEWS

LEGO

A container filled with millions of Lego pieces fell into the sea off Cornwall in 1997. But instead of remaining at the bottom of the ocean, they are still washing up on Cornish beaches today - offering an insight into the mysterious world of oceans and tides. Read more here…

BBC NEWS

What is the common thread between Plastic Pollution Coalition, Method, Sea Shepherd, D-Grade Clothingand Patagonia? The answer is simple: a shared focus on plastic pollution, and a commitment to innovative approaches.
Method’s plastic bottles made from recovered ocean plastic are well known and can be found in grocery stores in the United States. In 1993, Patagonia began to sell clothing items made from recycled plastic bottles. Dubai-based D-Grade Clothing, the winner of the 2013 Think Beyond Plastic innovation competition makes fabric and produces clothing out of recovered plastic bottles. Many more businesses and organizations participate in this effort with real solutions that involve community efforts and awareness building.
Netherlands-based G-Star Jeans announced their new collection of denim, Raw For The Oceans, which now includes yarn from plastic recovered from the ocean. The collection is curated by Pharrell Williams, who shared a positive message of hope for the ocean and the need for solutions. The announcement included Captain Paul Watson from SeaShepherd, who shared his personal sense of urgency regarding plastic pollution, as well as a message from Plastic Pollution Coalition about the need for change …. The audience? Not the usual environmentally educated group – fashion editors, designers and creative directors some of whom heard for the first time the message of plastic pollution.

What is the common thread between Plastic Pollution Coalition, MethodSea ShepherdD-Grade Clothingand Patagonia? The answer is simple: a shared focus on plastic pollution, and a commitment to innovative approaches.

Method’s plastic bottles made from recovered ocean plastic are well known and can be found in grocery stores in the United States. In 1993, Patagonia began to sell clothing items made from recycled plastic bottles. Dubai-based D-Grade Clothing, the winner of the 2013 Think Beyond Plastic innovation competition makes fabric and produces clothing out of recovered plastic bottles. Many more businesses and organizations participate in this effort with real solutions that involve community efforts and awareness building.

Netherlands-based G-Star Jeans announced their new collection of denim, Raw For The Oceans, which now includes yarn from plastic recovered from the ocean. The collection is curated by Pharrell Williams, who shared a positive message of hope for the ocean and the need for solutions. The announcement included Captain Paul Watson from SeaShepherd, who shared his personal sense of urgency regarding plastic pollution, as well as a message from Plastic Pollution Coalition about the need for change …. The audience? Not the usual environmentally educated group – fashion editors, designers and creative directors some of whom heard for the first time the message of plastic pollution.

Andres Amador
You cannot see it in a studio, you cannot own it and it lasts for just hours but an artist from San Francisco is gaining worldwide acclaim for his work.

Andres Amador uses a rake to create stunning designs on beaches which are washed away with the tides.

See the BBC video here

Andres Amador

You cannot see it in a studio, you cannot own it and it lasts for just hours but an artist from San Francisco is gaining worldwide acclaim for his work.

Andres Amador uses a rake to create stunning designs on beaches which are washed away with the tides.

See the BBC video here

Sea Chair film by Studio Swine.

Tide + Time
Out for a run in Norfolk, Nathan happened across this wonderful gate.

Tide + Time

Out for a run in Norfolk, Nathan happened across this wonderful gate.

FLICKR
Amazing photos of plastic on the beach by kjcrichton
https://www.flickr.com/groups/1474656@N20/
Plastic oceans group
https://www.flickr.com/photos/kjcrichton/

FLICKR

Amazing photos of plastic on the beach by kjcrichton

https://www.flickr.com/groups/1474656@N20/

Plastic oceans group

https://www.flickr.com/photos/kjcrichton/

Penalty: 769 footballs found at sea
Beachwatch
If you love the shoreline local to you and want to help in a practical way then a year round programme called Beachwatch may be something you’d like to be involved in.
Beachwatch is the national beach cleaning programme set up by the Marine Conservation Society.  With beach cleans throughout the year plus the Beachwatch Big Weekend you can get involved in what’s happening locally or even organise an event of your own. This is one of the most influential and practical ways we can begin to reverse the increasing pollution in our marine ecosystem. To register visit their webpage here:    http://www.mcsuk.org/beachwatch/user/register<

Beachwatch

If you love the shoreline local to you and want to help in a practical way then a year round programme called Beachwatch may be something you’d like to be involved in.

Beachwatch is the national beach cleaning programme set up by the Marine Conservation Society.  With beach cleans throughout the year plus the Beachwatch Big Weekend you can get involved in what’s happening locally or even organise an event of your own. This is one of the most influential and practical ways we can begin to reverse the increasing pollution in our marine ecosystem. To register visit their webpage here:    http://www.mcsuk.org/beachwatch/user/register<

PPC
Support Plastic Pollution Coalition and buy our Reusable Water Bottle.
The Plastic Pollution Coalition was created with the vision of a world free of plastic pollution and the toxic impacts of plastic on humans, the environment, wildlife and marine life.
The mission of the Plastic Pollution Coalition is to measurably reduce plastic pollution and its toxic impacts on people, animal and the environment. To achieve this mission, the organization has formulated two strategic goals: (1) End the global dependence on disposable plastic, the primary source of plastic pollution. (2) Reduce the overall global plastic footprint of individuals, organizations, businesses and governments.
Plastic Pollution Coalition (US)

PPC

Support Plastic Pollution Coalition and buy our Reusable Water Bottle.

The Plastic Pollution Coalition was created with the vision of a world free of plastic pollution and the toxic impacts of plastic on humans, the environment, wildlife and marine life.

The mission of the Plastic Pollution Coalition is to measurably reduce plastic pollution and its toxic impacts on people, animal and the environment. To achieve this mission, the organization has formulated two strategic goals: (1) End the global dependence on disposable plastic, the primary source of plastic pollution. (2) Reduce the overall global plastic footprint of individuals, organizations, businesses and governments.

Plastic Pollution Coalition (US)

Germany’s first waste-free supermarket about to open its doors…

Micro plastic beads in our toothpaste and scrubs
Microbeads are minute plastic beads that are manufactured and used in a wide variety of consumer products such as toothpaste and cosmetic scrubs. Patented in the 1970s these microbeads have only been used as a disposable entity in consumer products recently.
A major concern with microbeads is that because of their small size, they have a large surface area by volume, so as a consequence of their use, huge numbers of ready-made, highly efficient toxic accumulators are being intentionally discharged into waste water systems.
Three-quarters of the brands use microbeads with a modal size of less than 100 microns. Particles of this size are ingested by planktonic organisms at the base of the food chain. Over time these micro plastics are subjected to UV-degradation and absorb hydrophobic materials such as PCBs, making them smaller and more toxic over time. These plastics therefore pose an immediate and long-term threat to the health of the oceans and the food we eat as the plastics enter the food chain.
Companies that use these micro plastics include,
Nivea (Beiersdorf), Biore (Kao), Kiehl&#8217;s (L’Oreal), Lancome (L’Oreal), Olay (Proctor &amp; Gamble), L’Oreal, Shiseido, Clinique, Boots, Estee Lauder, Superdrug, Gatsby (Mandom Corp), The Body Shop (L’Oreal), Darlie (Toothpaste), Neutrogena (Johnson &amp; Johnson) (source Plastic Free Seas).
For more information on what you can do and which companies use these micro plastics in their products visit Plastic Free Sea

Micro plastic beads in our toothpaste and scrubs

Microbeads are minute plastic beads that are manufactured and used in a wide variety of consumer products such as toothpaste and cosmetic scrubs. Patented in the 1970s these microbeads have only been used as a disposable entity in consumer products recently.

A major concern with microbeads is that because of their small size, they have a large surface area by volume, so as a consequence of their use, huge numbers of ready-made, highly efficient toxic accumulators are being intentionally discharged into waste water systems.

Three-quarters of the brands use microbeads with a modal size of less than 100 microns. Particles of this size are ingested by planktonic organisms at the base of the food chain. Over time these micro plastics are subjected to UV-degradation and absorb hydrophobic materials such as PCBs, making them smaller and more toxic over time. These plastics therefore pose an immediate and long-term threat to the health of the oceans and the food we eat as the plastics enter the food chain.

Companies that use these micro plastics include,

Nivea (Beiersdorf), Biore (Kao), Kiehl’s (L’Oreal), Lancome (L’Oreal), Olay (Proctor & Gamble), L’Oreal, Shiseido, Clinique, Boots, Estee Lauder, Superdrug, Gatsby (Mandom Corp), The Body Shop (L’Oreal), Darlie (Toothpaste), Neutrogena (Johnson & Johnson) (source Plastic Free Seas).

For more information on what you can do and which companies use these micro plastics in their products visit Plastic Free Sea

Tide Time - Running the Numbers
Chris Jordan is an American artist famed for his mass consumption images. In his series called Running the Numbers he explores the impact of global consumerism. In this image he looks into plastic bottle tops. Bottle tops are a major cause of pollutants in our oceanic waters travelling thousands of miles and getting lodged in the stomachs of marine wildlife who mistake the tops for food. To highlight the extent of the problem the 400,000 bottle tops depicted in his piece ‘Caps Seurat’ represent the average number of plastic bottles used in the United States every minute.
To view this image in detail Chris Jordan&#8217;s site   
Visit our Tide Time Blog and read No. 3 of our Ten Small Things series to find out what we can do to help.

Tide Time - Running the Numbers

Chris Jordan is an American artist famed for his mass consumption images. In his series called Running the Numbers he explores the impact of global consumerism. In this image he looks into plastic bottle tops. Bottle tops are a major cause of pollutants in our oceanic waters travelling thousands of miles and getting lodged in the stomachs of marine wildlife who mistake the tops for food. To highlight the extent of the problem the 400,000 bottle tops depicted in his piece ‘Caps Seurat’ represent the average number of plastic bottles used in the United States every minute.

To view this image in detail Chris Jordan’s site   

Visit our Tide Time Blog and read No. 3 of our Ten Small Things series to find out what we can do to help.

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