TIDAL PRESS TIDE TABLES
Get them here… A6 everytime :-)
DOUGLAS PRESS

TIDAL PRESS TIDE TABLES

Get them here… A6 everytime :-)

DOUGLAS PRESS

TEN SMALL THINGS
By making small changes in our lives, together we can all make a huge difference to the world around us. Here are some essentials to help limit plastic waste in our environment.
NO.5
USE YOUR LOCAL GREENGROCER OR FARMERS MARKET

Packaging in supermarkets is excessive, especially with fresh fruit and vegetables. Film-wrapped cucumbers? Avocados on a plastic-wrapped tray?

Shopping at your local farmers market or greengrocer not only cuts down on plastic packaging as they generally wrap produce in paper bags, it is also likely to cut down on packaging used to transport the food.  It is also CHEAPER. Cutting out the middle man, packaging and often transport costs means farmers markets and local greengrocers can keep costs low.  It also helps support your local community.

TEN SMALL THINGS

By making small changes in our lives, together we can all make a huge difference to the world around us. Here are some essentials to help limit plastic waste in our environment.

NO.5

USE YOUR LOCAL GREENGROCER OR FARMERS MARKET

Packaging in supermarkets is excessive, especially with fresh fruit and vegetables. Film-wrapped cucumbers? Avocados on a plastic-wrapped tray?
Shopping at your local farmers market or greengrocer not only cuts down on plastic packaging as they generally wrap produce in paper bags, it is also likely to cut down on packaging used to transport the food.  It is also CHEAPER. Cutting out the middle man, packaging and often transport costs means farmers markets and local greengrocers can keep costs low.  It also helps support your local community.
Two young scientists break down plastics with bacteria
After a visit to a plastic-filled waste transfer station last year, students Miranda Wang and Jeanny Yao learned that much of the plastic in trash may not degrade for 5,000 years. Synthesised into plastics are phthalates, compounds that make shower curtain liners, food wraps and other products bendable but may also adversely impact human reproductive development and health.  As plastics slowly break down, these phthalates would leach into the surrounding environment.
 
So, the two young scientists tackled the problem and ultimately discovered strains of bacteria that have the potential to naturally degrade phthalates.

Hear all about their amazing work here:  TED

Two young scientists break down plastics with bacteria

After a visit to a plastic-filled waste transfer station last year, students Miranda Wang and Jeanny Yao learned that much of the plastic in trash may not degrade for 5,000 years. Synthesised into plastics are phthalates, compounds that make shower curtain liners, food wraps and other products bendable but may also adversely impact human reproductive development and health.  As plastics slowly break down, these phthalates would leach into the surrounding environment.
 
So, the two young scientists tackled the problem and ultimately discovered strains of bacteria that have the potential to naturally degrade phthalates.
Hear all about their amazing work here:  TED
THESE GIANT FISH
 Rising out of the sand at Botofogo Beach in Rio de Janeiro are made almost entirely out of discarded plastic bottles. They were created in conjunction with this year’s U.N. Conference on Sustainable Development, a theme of which is plastic as one of the ocean’s most problematic pollutants.
Art from waste to raise awareness.

THESE GIANT FISH

Rising out of the sand at Botofogo Beach in Rio de Janeiro are made almost entirely out of discarded plastic bottles. They were created in conjunction with this year’s U.N. Conference on Sustainable Development, a theme of which is plastic as one of the ocean’s most problematic pollutants.

Art from waste to raise awareness.

INSPIRING PEOPLE
Environmentalist Emily Penn At just 23 years old Emily Penn became founding partner and director of Pangea Explorations, an organization that benefits oceanic studies. Through Pangea, she organized an environmental education program and one of the largest cleanup campaigns in history on the remote islands of Tonga—seventy percent of the population helped to remove more than 120,000 pounds of trash.
More about Emily

INSPIRING PEOPLE

Environmentalist Emily Penn At just 23 years old Emily Penn became founding partner and director of Pangea Explorations, an organization that benefits oceanic studies. Through Pangea, she organized an environmental education program and one of the largest cleanup campaigns in history on the remote islands of Tonga—seventy percent of the population helped to remove more than 120,000 pounds of trash.

More about Emily

TEN SMALL THINGS
By making small changes in our lives, together we can all make a huge difference to the world around us. Here are some essentials to help limit plastic waste in our environment.  
NO.4
Five trillion plastic carrier bags are produced each year and at present more than 98 per cent end up in landfill. About 200 million litter the countryside. Millions more find themselves in the sea and in the stomachs of marine life. We use them for an average of 20 minutes.

To stop the madness and do your bit, get into the habit of taking your own bags to the shops.
Companies such as Onya produce great re-usable bags that fold up to fit in your handbag or pocket.  http://www.onyabags.co.uk/  Otherwise most stores will give you the option to buy re-usable.  If you do one thing this week, do this thing.

TEN SMALL THINGS

By making small changes in our lives, together we can all make a huge difference to the world around us. Here are some essentials to help limit plastic waste in our environment.  

NO.4

Five trillion plastic carrier bags are produced each year and at present more than 98 per cent end up in landfill. About 200 million litter the countryside. Millions more find themselves in the sea and in the stomachs of marine life. We use them for an average of 20 minutes.
To stop the madness and do your bit, get into the habit of taking your own bags to the shops.
Companies such as Onya produce great re-usable bags that fold up to fit in your handbag or pocket.  http://www.onyabags.co.uk/  Otherwise most stores will give you the option to buy re-usable.  If you do one thing this week, do this thing.

Dorset Storm Debris and rare barnacles

The storms of January and February have brought an increased level of littler debris to the beaches of Dorset and beyond.  Amongst the debris have been discovered several species of rare and exotic sea creatures including Ivory Barnacles, which are native to North America, the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico. This is the first time these crustaceans have been recorded on land in the UK.  These creatures, along with lepas hillii, a species of Goose Barnacle, and jingle shells, have travelled about 5,000 miles on the tides, mainly carried on American fishing litter.   Goose Barnacles are one of the few things to benefit from rubbish as a habitat. They will settle on anything that floats.  Marine litter is a potential way for species to spread from one country to another and it is likely that we could get an increase in non-native species to our UK shores.  This can cause problems as some, such as Wireweed seaweed and Slipper Limpets, can be invasive to our native species.
CALLING ALL FOOTBALLS!
I am the photographer, Mandy Barker, internationally renowned for the project, SOUP, and am now collecting marine debris Footballs (round soccer balls) that have been found on beaches/washed up, for my next project. I am hoping to get footballs (even parts of will do) from as many different countries/beaches from around the world as possible. If you saw a football washed up and would be willing to post it on to me in the UK, telling me where you found it (and could add an emailed pic of where you found it & date) I would be extremely grateful. I will of course pay all postage costs and in return send you a postcard of the final image which will include your ball!
If you can help or know someone who could, please email me: info@mandy-barker.com for my postal address.
Deadline for balls collected is end March 2014.
My work aims to engage the public by combining the contradiction between initial aesthetic attraction with
the message of awareness about plastic marine pollution. To view my previous images please visit http://mandy-barker.com  
All footballs will be greatly received & thank you for helping me to increase awareness of issue of marine pollution.

Schofield commissioned a piece by Mandy. Go here to see it.
http://schofieldwatchcompany.com/product-category/art/

CALLING ALL FOOTBALLS!

I am the photographer, Mandy Barker, internationally renowned for the project, SOUP, and am now collecting marine debris Footballs (round soccer balls) that have been found on beaches/washed up, for my next project. I am hoping to get footballs (even parts of will do) from as many different countries/beaches from around the world as possible. If you saw a football washed up and would be willing to post it on to me in the UK, telling me where you found it (and could add an emailed pic of where you found it & date) I would be extremely grateful. I will of course pay all postage costs and in return send you a postcard of the final image which will include your ball!

If you can help or know someone who could, please email me: info@mandy-barker.com for my postal address.

Deadline for balls collected is end March 2014.

My work aims to engage the public by combining the contradiction between initial aesthetic attraction with
the message of awareness about plastic marine pollution. To view my previous images please visit http://mandy-barker.com  

All footballs will be greatly received & thank you for helping me to increase awareness of issue of marine pollution.

Schofield commissioned a piece by Mandy. Go here to see it.

http://schofieldwatchcompany.com/product-category/art/

SHOREHAM-BY-SEA
Our Tide Time blog is dedicated to discussing the issue of plastic pollution in the marine environment and especially on our shorelines. Dear to our hearts at Schofield is that little stretch of beach at Shoreham that runs from the fort to the Church of the Good Shepherd. Many childhood memories of summer days playing in the shingle and swimming in the sea mingle with latter day walks beach combing along the shore and sitting looking out to sea under a blanket, sheltering from the wintry onshore breeze that accompanies a diluted sun.
Shoreham Beach has been designated a Local Nature Reserve since 2006 due to the diverse and flora rich habitat of vegetated shingle. More than 90 species of plants can be found along the shingle including pink Ivy-leaved Toadflax, Thrift, Wild Sea Campion and the bright yellow downy flowers of Kidney Vetch. During late May and into June the beach is awash with colour as the Sea Kale and Red Valerian come into bloom.
The storms of February have caused huge swells to break on Shoreham Beach bringing a confusion of plastic debris, drift-wood, seaweed and crustaceans to rest on the shingle at the high tide mark. We took a cold February walk down to Shoreham just a few days back and found the shore strewn with starfish. Hundreds of these beautiful creatures were stranded on the shingle. It is not clear whether these creatures were brought here by the stormy seas or by a combination of fishing practices and the rougher sea conditions disturbing their seabed habitat. After taking some pictures and taking in the sad scene we made our way to the beachside bakery for a coffee before heading back to Schofield.

SHOREHAM-BY-SEA

Our Tide Time blog is dedicated to discussing the issue of plastic pollution in the marine environment and especially on our shorelines. Dear to our hearts at Schofield is that little stretch of beach at Shoreham that runs from the fort to the Church of the Good Shepherd. Many childhood memories of summer days playing in the shingle and swimming in the sea mingle with latter day walks beach combing along the shore and sitting looking out to sea under a blanket, sheltering from the wintry onshore breeze that accompanies a diluted sun.
Shoreham Beach has been designated a Local Nature Reserve since 2006 due to the diverse and flora rich habitat of vegetated shingle. More than 90 species of plants can be found along the shingle including pink Ivy-leaved Toadflax, Thrift, Wild Sea Campion and the bright yellow downy flowers of Kidney Vetch. During late May and into June the beach is awash with colour as the Sea Kale and Red Valerian come into bloom.
The storms of February have caused huge swells to break on Shoreham Beach bringing a confusion of plastic debris, drift-wood, seaweed and crustaceans to rest on the shingle at the high tide mark. We took a cold February walk down to Shoreham just a few days back and found the shore strewn with starfish. Hundreds of these beautiful creatures were stranded on the shingle. It is not clear whether these creatures were brought here by the stormy seas or by a combination of fishing practices and the rougher sea conditions disturbing their seabed habitat. After taking some pictures and taking in the sad scene we made our way to the beachside bakery for a coffee before heading back to Schofield.
Tide Time…
Detail from our Mandy Barker comission. Titled ‘Tide Time’. This plastic wrist watch toy takes centre stage amongst a myriad of colours and shapes.
As John Steinbeck said ‘The myriad of tiny dots that go to make up darkness’
Tide Time on the Schofield site

Tide Time…

Detail from our Mandy Barker comission. Titled ‘Tide Time’. This plastic wrist watch toy takes centre stage amongst a myriad of colours and shapes.

As John Steinbeck said ‘The myriad of tiny dots that go to make up darkness’

Tide Time on the Schofield site

TEN SMALL THINGS
By making small changes in our lives, together we can all make a huge difference to the world around us. Here are some essentials to help limit plastic waste in our environment.  
NO.3
Plastic bottles and coffee cups
We throw away 200 BILLION plastic water bottles a year! There are two things we can start doing today that will make a real difference to the mountains of plastic bottle waste that threaten our environment. Firstly, why not invest in a re-usable bottle? There are hundreds of options out there to suit your every need. Secondly, try and encourage the use of tap water in restaurants and cafes. It helps limit plastic pollution and is cheaper for you.
Rather than throwing away disposable coffee cups why not invest in a reusable cup and take it with you for your morning coffee?
It’s all about spreading the word! Every little bit helps.
Do you like walking on a beach strewn with plastic waste? NO!

TEN SMALL THINGS

By making small changes in our lives, together we can all make a huge difference to the world around us. Here are some essentials to help limit plastic waste in our environment.  

NO.3

Plastic bottles and coffee cups

We throw away 200 BILLION plastic water bottles a year! There are two things we can start doing today that will make a real difference to the mountains of plastic bottle waste that threaten our environment. Firstly, why not invest in a re-usable bottle? There are hundreds of options out there to suit your every need. Secondly, try and encourage the use of tap water in restaurants and cafes. It helps limit plastic pollution and is cheaper for you.

Rather than throwing away disposable coffee cups why not invest in a reusable cup and take it with you for your morning coffee?

It’s all about spreading the word! Every little bit helps.

Do you like walking on a beach strewn with plastic waste? NO!

BUBBLE WRAP PART 2
Finding an alternative to bubble wrap - The last leg in removing consumable plastic from the Schofield offices.
Here are some of our discoveries so far.

There are now various new varieties of eco-bubble wrap. Some are bio-degradable, taking 18 months to biodegrade fully from first exposure to sunlight.  Some take longer.  These products biodegrade into biomass and water, releasing carbon into the atmosphere. Although an improvement on traditional bubble wrap, these products are still oil based and synthetic making them unsustainable in the long run as well as adding to carbon emissions in the atmosphere.

Green wrap is another ready-made substitute for bubble wrap fabricated from recycled cardboard and tissue.  Perfect for certain uses and fully uses only recycled materials.

Then there are companies like ‘Leavs’ who have created sustainable, organic eco packaging alternatives to oil based synthetic products.  The majority of materials used in Leavs Packaging are grown on its South Norfolk farm to the highest environmental standards.

Greencell and other similar companies use PLAs (Polylactic acid), a plastic substitute made from fermented plant starch (usually corn) as a replacement for oil based plastics to produce a variety of foam wraps, bags and foam padding.  There are, however, numerous problems associated with the production of PLAs.  PLAs de-compost very slowly unless subjected to industrial composting. They generally use genetically modified corn, PLa cannot be mixed with other plastics and so a whole infrastructure of recycling on an industrial scale would need to be created.  There are also many problems associated with corn production which are too numerous to discuss here.

Other more appealing alternatives include using popcorn as a replacement for foam peanuts, recycling paper and cardboard as packaging materials, as well as cushion packaging made from one hundred percent post-consumer waste paper.  The search continues…

Leavs (UK)

BUBBLE WRAP PART 2

Finding an alternative to bubble wrap - The last leg in removing consumable plastic from the Schofield offices.

Here are some of our discoveries so far.
There are now various new varieties of eco-bubble wrap. Some are bio-degradable, taking 18 months to biodegrade fully from first exposure to sunlight.  Some take longer.  These products biodegrade into biomass and water, releasing carbon into the atmosphere. Although an improvement on traditional bubble wrap, these products are still oil based and synthetic making them unsustainable in the long run as well as adding to carbon emissions in the atmosphere.
Green wrap is another ready-made substitute for bubble wrap fabricated from recycled cardboard and tissue.  Perfect for certain uses and fully uses only recycled materials.
Then there are companies like Leavs’ who have created sustainable, organic eco packaging alternatives to oil based synthetic products.  The majority of materials used in Leavs Packaging are grown on its South Norfolk farm to the highest environmental standards.
Greencell and other similar companies use PLAs (Polylactic acid), a plastic substitute made from fermented plant starch (usually corn) as a replacement for oil based plastics to produce a variety of foam wraps, bags and foam padding.  There are, however, numerous problems associated with the production of PLAs.  PLAs de-compost very slowly unless subjected to industrial composting. They generally use genetically modified corn, PLa cannot be mixed with other plastics and so a whole infrastructure of recycling on an industrial scale would need to be created.  There are also many problems associated with corn production which are too numerous to discuss here.
Other more appealing alternatives include using popcorn as a replacement for foam peanuts, recycling paper and cardboard as packaging materials, as well as cushion packaging made from one hundred percent post-consumer waste paper.  The search continues
Leavs (UK)
BUBBLE WRAP PART 1
Finding an alternative to bubble wrap - The last leg in removing consumable plastic from the Schofield offices.
In 1957 two inventors, Alfred Fielding and Marc Chavannes, were attempting to create a three-dimensional plastic wallpaper. Although their idea was doomed to failure they found that it did make a great packing material.  And so the world was introduced to bubble wrap.  It is now a multi-billion dollar industry.  It is also highly toxic and harmful to the environment.
Bubble wrap is made of polyethylene. Polyethylene products are created through environmentally unfriendly practices and the finished products take hundreds of years to break down.

Foam peanuts, mostly made from polystyrene are made from crude oil, itself a scarcity, and they don’t totally break down, just fragment, leaching toxic chemicals during the process. If burned, polystyrene gives off highly toxic fumes.

Aside from the toxic chemicals used with most plastic based packing materials and the huge energy resources that go into creating them, the amount of landfill taken up after they are discarded is phenomenal.  In the UK our potential to recycle and re-process bubble wrap is negligible.

At Schofield we are currently exploring alternatives.  When bubble wrap arrives in the office from other companies it is recycled and we ask the company to use alternatives in the future. Hating bubble wrap is a good thing.

Find out what we have discovered so far in the next post…… 

BUBBLE WRAP PART 1

Finding an alternative to bubble wrap - The last leg in removing consumable plastic from the Schofield offices.

In 1957 two inventors, Alfred Fielding and Marc Chavannes, were attempting to create a three-dimensional plastic wallpaper. Although their idea was doomed to failure they found that it did make a great packing material.  And so the world was introduced to bubble wrap.  It is now a multi-billion dollar industry.  It is also highly toxic and harmful to the environment.

Bubble wrap is made of polyethylene. Polyethylene products are created through environmentally unfriendly practices and the finished products take hundreds of years to break down.
Foam peanuts, mostly made from polystyrene are made from crude oil, itself a scarcity, and they dont totally break down, just fragment, leaching toxic chemicals during the process. If burned, polystyrene gives off highly toxic fumes.
Aside from the toxic chemicals used with most plastic based packing materials and the huge energy resources that go into creating them, the amount of landfill taken up after they are discarded is phenomenal.  In the UK our potential to recycle and re-process bubble wrap is negligible.
At Schofield we are currently exploring alternatives.  When bubble wrap arrives in the office from other companies it is recycled and we ask the company to use alternatives in the future. Hating bubble wrap is a good thing.
Find out what we have discovered so far in the next post…… 
(1 is a piece of plastic, and 2-6 are the critters that live on it.)
Why don’t we find the tiniest plastic particles in our nets?  It’s always puzzled us why particles less than .5mm are less abundant than those between .5mm and 1mm. You would think the opposite would be true, but remember we’re only skimming the surface of the sea. We focused on the microplastic we collected in the North Pacific Gyre in 2011 and found something interesting that we just published.
Read more at the 5gyres.org

(1 is a piece of plastic, and 2-6 are the critters that live on it.)

Why don’t we find the tiniest plastic particles in our nets?  It’s always puzzled us why particles less than .5mm are less abundant than those between .5mm and 1mm. You would think the opposite would be true, but remember we’re only skimming the surface of the sea. We focused on the microplastic we collected in the North Pacific Gyre in 2011 and found something interesting that we just published.

Read more at the 5gyres.org

TEN SMALL THINGS
By making small changes in our lives, together we can all make a huge difference to the world around us. Here are some essentials to help limit plastic waste in our environment.  
NO.2
Cup of tea?
165,000,000 cups of tea are drunk in the UK every single day. Thats a lot of teabags!

A report by Which? found that teabags produced by top tea manufacturers such as Tetley, PG Tips, Twinings, Clipper and Typhoo are only between 70-80% biodegradable.
The rest is made of polypropylene. And as we all know, plastic does not biodegrade!
Make a big difference by changing your normal teabag for a fully-biodegradable one, or even try using loose tea. Loose tea is sophisticated and classy - Be that!

http://www.jacksonsofpiccadilly.co.uk/

TEN SMALL THINGS

By making small changes in our lives, together we can all make a huge difference to the world around us. Here are some essentials to help limit plastic waste in our environment.  

NO.2

Cup of tea?

165,000,000 cups of tea are drunk in the UK every single day. Thats a lot of teabags!

A report by Which? found that teabags produced by top tea manufacturers such as Tetley, PG Tips, Twinings, Clipper and Typhoo are only between 70-80% biodegradable.

The rest is made of polypropylene. And as we all know, plastic does not biodegrade!

Make a big difference by changing your normal teabag for a fully-biodegradable one, or even try using loose tea. Loose tea is sophisticated and classy - Be that!

http://www.jacksonsofpiccadilly.co.uk/

note: loading more posts will reset any filters applied
More